Hermione's Bookshelf

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skullspeare:

blastortoise:

I never tell people off the bat that I’m gay. I wait. I wait until they say some homophobic shit and then I laugh and am like “you know I’m gay right?” And watch the look of terror on their face.

i like you

american-eater:

do u ever ship something so hard

that you literally cant imagine either of them w someone else

like its not that you dont want to imagine them with someone else 

its that you cant

pun-rocker:

You know why I love AUs? Because the whole point of them is that everything is changed, and yet these two people are still going to meet and fall in love- that they’re so set in stone and so meant to be that you can change literally everything in a hundred universes and they’ll fall in love over and over again. 

the-real-seebs:

rhube:

The End of Gamers

kierongillen:

dangolding:

The last few weeks in videogame culture have seen a level of combativeness more marked and bitter than any beforehand.

First, a developer—a woman who makes games who has had so much piled on to her that I don’t want to perpetuate things by naming her—was the target of a harassment campaign that…

This is really strong.

OK, I am getting super annoyed with men talking about this framing the discussion as being in a history where women only recently started playing games or contributing to the industry.

WOMEN HAVE ALWAYS GAMED. THE FIRST COMPUTER PROGRAMMER WAS A WOMAN. GET THIS THROUGH YOUR SKULL.

It’s like figures forcing you to concede that adult women make up roughly half of gamers have just made you move it back ‘Oh, well, they didn’t used to’ or ‘They only used to play girly games/casual games’. STOP. NO. I KNOW YOU THINK YOU’RE HELPING, BUT YOU’RE NOT.

We have always been here and we have always experienced shitty levels of sexism and exclusion when we have tried to do so.

The difference is that the Intenert has made the fact that we game and talk about gaming and critique gaming and write games impossible to ignore. That is why the backlash has become so vicious. Erasure by simply acting as though we aren’t there isn’t possible anymore, so the tactics have become more direct.

Look, guys, I appreciate that you care and that you want to show your outrage (and pat each other on the back for being so powerfully outraged) but you really need to be aware of how you can still be and are perpetuating the culture that begets this.

Stop painting us as new. Stop painting us as taking someone else’s toys.  Stop pretending that the sexism of the ‘old days’ was OK, because only boys played. No. Girls played. Women played. Women have always played. The sexism was there not as some kind of natural consequence of only supplying to boys, but as a consequence of the massively sexist culture in which we still exist and in which you partake.

Pretty much this. There have been women playing video games for as long as I can remember. Like, by the time I was able to mostly distinguish between boys and girls, it was pretty much a given that any kids whose parents would let them would play video games, and lots of adults did too.

If someone is gonna try to convince me that women weren’t “gamers” from the very earliest days, they’d have to explain what exactly every girl I knew in college was doing in those MUDs, because that sure looked like gaming to me.

All of this. Read the commentary. While the OP has, I think, some good intentions, rhube provides excellent commentary. They are correct in pointing out the wrongness of the very flawed and often-repeated claim that diversity is some new thing to adjust to, rather than something that’s always been there. (The same is true for other activities and interests as well.)

I especially love the following.

"Stop pretending that the sexism of the ‘old days’ was OK, because only boys played. No. Girls played. Women played. Women have always played. The sexism was there not as some kind of natural consequence of only supplying to boys, but as a consequence of the massively sexist culture in which we still exist and in which you partake." (Source: rhube - http://rhube.tumblr.com/post/95993299513/the-end-of-gamers)

superopinionated:

ohdeargodbees:

wilwheaton:

konradwerks:

The situation is just intolerable. 
There have been a lot of really insightful write-ups recently. A broader perspective—and I almost cringe to say—catch-all by Molly Crabapple left me gasping for breath. This write up, by Elizabeth Sampat giving her thoughts on an industry that’s very dear to me, delivered the final blow and left me in tears.
It’s really rare that I create from a place of grief. It’s just not how I operate. But it’s largely what I have openly felt for the last few days, and reflecting on it, it’s been there for far longer.
This quote from Elizabeth’s piece— “We should have a war memorial for all of the women we have lost to this. We should lay flowers and grieve and see our reflections in stone.”— struck a very literal chord in me.
So yeah, here it is. A place just for me where I can light a candle and remember all of the wonderful people I probably will never get the chance to meet.  Folks that have been driven away by these horrible fucks that have the audacity to think they know what gaming and community is about.
en memoriam.

I have never, in my life, been ashamed to call myself a gamer. Until now. These misogynist little shitbags are a disgrace to our community.
All of us who care about gaming need to step up and save our community, while there is still something about it that’s worth saving.

RIP women like me. This is beautiful.
I refuse to be added to or thought of as a casualty though. I can keep going. But those who couldn’t or can’t, you are missed. Your voices are missed. I hope I can help carry your memory forward and continue to say “never again”.

Until the game industry/community has active channels of support for survivors of rape and sexual assault in the industry, and mechanisms to prevent developers who commit rape and sexual assault from continuing to do that, in a way that is peaceful and brings about permanent positive change, I’m gonna have a real hard time believing shit about shit.And this is just, like, one thing I see the deeply enmeshed communities of Game Industry and Consumers of Games (note how it’s often difficult to talk about the industry without also having to assume discussion of the community of fans) needing to address."Saving" or whatever is nice, but fundamental structural changes…f-fundamentally change things, and that will probably feel uncomfortable.We know what white people (hi) and men, and especially white men, are like when they’re uncomfortable. They turn into misogynist, racist, entitled little shitbags. I don’t see that changing even if everyone sent Zoe a dollar for every word of abuse she’s received (which hey we should also do, where’s the Indiegogo to help pay for this woman’s long-term emotional health, if everyone’s so damn sorry?). The hatred of women runs wide and deep in games, it won’t end when Zoe’s not getting harassed every day, it won’t be gone when Anita’s series is done, it wasn’t gone when I left games, it didn’t disappear when Maddy Myers stopped going to public fighting games tournaments, it didn’t go away when Jade Raymond stopped being the face of the Assassin’s Creed series (these are just the names off the top of my head, writing into the little XKit reblog window right now)…and meanwhile FYI sexual assaults happen at and around all your fave big tent-pole gamer and game industry events, and throughout the industry all the time, because misogynist little shitbags don’t just PLAY games they also MAKE them. But who wants to report on a colleague, who *doesn’t* want to sign up for this sort of experience (but coming from your coworkers, and at work events)?(But I’m supposed to have #1reasonwhy I’m excited a woman wants to work in that industry.)

superopinionated:

ohdeargodbees:

wilwheaton:

konradwerks:

The situation is just intolerable.

There have been a lot of really insightful write-ups recently. A broader perspective—and I almost cringe to say—catch-all by Molly Crabapple left me gasping for breath. This write up, by Elizabeth Sampat giving her thoughts on an industry that’s very dear to me, delivered the final blow and left me in tears.

It’s really rare that I create from a place of grief. It’s just not how I operate. But it’s largely what I have openly felt for the last few days, and reflecting on it, it’s been there for far longer.

This quote from Elizabeth’s piece— “We should have a war memorial for all of the women we have lost to this. We should lay flowers and grieve and see our reflections in stone.”— struck a very literal chord in me.

So yeah, here it is. A place just for me where I can light a candle and remember all of the wonderful people I probably will never get the chance to meet.  Folks that have been driven away by these horrible fucks that have the audacity to think they know what gaming and community is about.

en memoriam.

I have never, in my life, been ashamed to call myself a gamer. Until now. These misogynist little shitbags are a disgrace to our community.

All of us who care about gaming need to step up and save our community, while there is still something about it that’s worth saving.

RIP women like me. This is beautiful.

I refuse to be added to or thought of as a casualty though. I can keep going. But those who couldn’t or can’t, you are missed. Your voices are missed. I hope I can help carry your memory forward and continue to say “never again”.

Until the game industry/community has active channels of support for survivors of rape and sexual assault in the industry, and mechanisms to prevent developers who commit rape and sexual assault from continuing to do that, in a way that is peaceful and brings about permanent positive change, I’m gonna have a real hard time believing shit about shit.

And this is just, like, one thing I see the deeply enmeshed communities of Game Industry and Consumers of Games (note how it’s often difficult to talk about the industry without also having to assume discussion of the community of fans) needing to address.

"Saving" or whatever is nice, but fundamental structural changes…f-fundamentally change things, and that will probably feel uncomfortable.

We know what white people (hi) and men, and especially white men, are like when they’re uncomfortable. They turn into misogynist, racist, entitled little shitbags. I don’t see that changing even if everyone sent Zoe a dollar for every word of abuse she’s received (which hey we should also do, where’s the Indiegogo to help pay for this woman’s long-term emotional health, if everyone’s so damn sorry?).

The hatred of women runs wide and deep in games, it won’t end when Zoe’s not getting harassed every day, it won’t be gone when Anita’s series is done, it wasn’t gone when I left games, it didn’t disappear when Maddy Myers stopped going to public fighting games tournaments, it didn’t go away when Jade Raymond stopped being the face of the Assassin’s Creed series (these are just the names off the top of my head, writing into the little XKit reblog window right now)

…and meanwhile FYI sexual assaults happen at and around all your fave big tent-pole gamer and game industry events, and throughout the industry all the time, because misogynist little shitbags don’t just PLAY games they also MAKE them. But who wants to report on a colleague, who *doesn’t* want to sign up for this sort of experience (but coming from your coworkers, and at work events)?

(But I’m supposed to have #1reasonwhy I’m excited a woman wants to work in that industry.)

sherbert-drawin:

America Chavez, Miles Morales, and Kamala Khan - three of my favourite Marvel superhero teens ever

Already love America Chavez and Kamala Khan. Planning to read Miles Morales’ story soon.

sherbert-drawin:

America Chavez, Miles Morales, and Kamala Khan - three of my favourite Marvel superhero teens ever

Already love America Chavez and Kamala Khan. Planning to read Miles Morales’ story soon.

Empathy is for white men

saathi1013:

sugarfey:

I’ve been having some thoughts about fandom and selective empathy, and this is my attempt to get them down into some sort of coherent post.

Fandom is far more inclined to empathise with white male characters, I think this is fairly common knowledge. I’m interested in discussing how this comes about.

I think the reasons are twofold. The first is that in white male-centric fictional media (ie. the media that usually gains the largest and most active fandoms), the narrative overwhelmingly positions the audience to empathise with the cis white male character over the non-cis white male characters. Take Captain America: The Winter Soldier, for example. Steve Rogers; a man with super strength, twice takes hold of Black Widow’s arm in a forceful manner, and once pushes her against a wall. In both cases, the narrative positions the audience to take Steve’s side, because he’s the All-American White Dude unleashing his righteous anger against the mysterious, morally grey foreign woman. Maybe we’ve even supposed to admire his restraint, even though he has superstrength and she doesn’t. The fact that he’s taking hold of her against her will goes unchallenged in the film and unchallenged by fandom, because our empathy in these scenes is reserved for Steve, not Natasha.

Similarly, every Marvel film and tv series since Avengers has featured a female character getting killed, either for plot progression (GotG), to further a white male character’s arc (GotG, Thor 2) or to show how evil the bad guy is (Iron Man 3, Thor 2, Cap 2). These deaths are barely a blip on the fandom radar, and if someone does criticise it, there will be dozens of responses trying to explain how necessary the death was and how disposable the characters are. By this same reasoning, Coulson’s death in Avengers should have had the same response from fandom, and yet there was a massive movement to bring him back. Why does only Coulson’s death create such outrage? Is it because we’re used to seeing women murdered on screen as a plot device, but white male characters should be worth more? A white man’s death has to Mean Something. Dying for plot progression? That’s for female characters.

I do think that most mainstream media narratives have more empathy for white men and a lot of problems stem from that, but I’m not giving fandom a free pass either. Even when the narrative asks us to feel empathy towards a non-white male character, fandom often dismisses it. Look at the way Pepper’s response to being woken up by an out of control iron suit was bashed by fandom, or Jane’s emotional responses are used to discredit her, or Natasha’s moments of vulnerability are taken as evidence of her failure as a character. Even when fans claim to like a female character, the response is often to place that character on a pedestal as a ‘flawless goddess,’ a porcelain doll to be placed on a shelf and admired from afar while you play with the flawed toys you actually love.

There is a reason that I’ve seen several gifsets linking Rocket’s speech in GotG to Bucky Barnes rather than Gamora, who is in the same scene, or to Natasha. Part of it is the text itself, because Bucky’s trauma was given narrative importance through the use of close up shirtless brainwashing shots, and Gamora’s trauma was glossed over in a few lines of exposition. But the other part of the reason is that fandom is more inclined to feel empathy for white men in the first place. It makes me uncomfortable that when we see a character who isn’t a cis white guy, our instinct is to dehumanise and criticise the character, rather than squeeing or shipping or analysing blinking patterns. This doesn’t occur in a vacuum.

yesssssss

pandaspwnz:

farfrompaid:

You not finding me attractive is not going to stop me from being attractive.

I SWEAR TO GOD IF YOU KEEP THIS MINDSET YOU WILL GET SOOO MUCH CONFIDENCE

trashboat:

i get anxious for people who fall asleep on public transit. like where is your home? how many stops have you missed? this was not a time for a nap

lordtrash:

If I ever like your sad post

It is support

I am not enjoying your tears